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Asia in the news articles, news, obituaries... 196 replies to this topic Started by Madara , Aug 18 2013 03:52 PM · 

#91 Madara

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 04:05 PM

More shenanigans as Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and President Xi Jinping meet and...shake hands (just barely)...

 

For China and Japan, a New Effort to Improve Relations Produces a Chilly Scene

http://www.nytimes.c...ref=todayspaper

 

abe-xi_custom-dc6bc1d296ed1e27f917076345

 

 



#92 Madara

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Posted 16 November 2014 - 04:58 PM

More on Japan's continuing (and shameless) campaign to deny coercion in the recruiting of "comfort women" during the war:

 

http://www.nytimes.c...ref=todayspaper

 



#93 Madara

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Posted 03 December 2014 - 11:06 AM

Even more on the same topic: A courageous Japanese journalist who has written about the "comfort women" is now under attack.

 

http://www.nytimes.c...odayspaper&_r=0

 

The Comments Section is especially interesting. I liked this one from "Sparkly Violet" in San Diego:

 

I admire Japan for many things, but this inability to own up to their history is extremely frustrating, and I believe it hurts them greatly in diminishing their standing in the world. When party A wrongs party B in an especially egregious way, there is no way for them to ever forgive and move past it until a sincere apology is issued. This is true regardless of whether you are the victim of a cheating spouse or a victim of violence - it is simply human nature. It is conceivable that I will forgive you for killing my father, but for that to happen, true contrition and apology must first be in place. Japan has made several half hearted apologies in the past to its Asian neighbors which were recognized as just that, half hearted.

There is nothing that breeds simmering resentment more than being a victim of injustice who is forced to witness over and over again the non-denial denial of the perpetrator. Japan has contributed so much to the world and should be universally admired and respected in their region. Instead, they are forever disliked and resented, never to play the leader role that they probably deserve. Imperial Japan perpetrated unspeakably cruel violence to much of Asia, the comfort women is just one small part of the horror they wrought. Until they truly come to terms with their past, they will continue to forfeit the universal respect and admiration that modern Japan deserves.

 

 

 



#94 Madara

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 03:43 PM

Japanese nationalists are trying to keep Angelina Jolie's new movie, UNBROKEN, out of theaters in Japan because it dares to tell the truth about Japan's brutal treatment of POWs during the war. 

 

http://insidemovies....ists-criticism/

 

 



#95 Madara

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Posted 13 December 2014 - 06:34 PM

There's an op-ed piece in today's New York Times on "Why Japanese Voters Feel Hopeless":

http://www.nytimes.c...odayspaper&_r=0

 

The first paragraph uses a Japanese term that I first heard on this board during a discussion of Aibon's troubles back in 2007.

 

 

 THE Japanese have a term for hopelessness — shikata ga nai, “it can’t be helped.” Acceptance of things as they are is deeply embedded in the culture. It also explains why voters are so listless, and even despairing, in the run-up to the national election on Sunday.

 

 



#96 Ap2000

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Posted 17 December 2014 - 12:29 AM

In case you didn't hear about it yet, Abe and the LDP (+Komeito) won what might be considered a landslide victory:

http://www3.nhk.or.j...h/20141215.html

Video: http://www3.nhk.or.j...1412122021.html

The coalition will stay the same (just as likely most ministers): http://www3.nhk.or.j...0141215_29.html

 

This will probably mean more conservative politics in the coming years.

Voter participation has also hit an all time low at 52~54%, if I read that correctly in a different article I can't find at the moment.



#97 Madara

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Posted 02 January 2015 - 11:36 AM

"To Rescue Economy, Japan Turns to Supermom"

 

http://www.nytimes.c...odayspaper&_r=0

 

Reforms for women in the Japanese workforce are most desired, but some sixth sense tells me it just won't happen in my lifetime.



#98 Ap2000

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  • I program stuff.

Posted 13 January 2015 - 08:51 PM

Really just a small thing, but I found it so ironic:

http://www3.nhk.or.j...0150113_24.html

 

"China's Defense Ministry on Monday criticized what it called an exaggeration of the Chinese military threat by Japan's top defense official. It said Nakatani was ignoring facts and rehashing old stories."



#99 Madara

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 11:08 PM

Here's an article from The New York Times Sunday Magazine on a growing movement of adoptees returning to their birth countries, with the focus mainly on American-raised Korean-born adoptees. It's fascinating stuff and raises all kinds of questions about race, culture, identity, etc.

 

Why a Generation of Adoptees Is Returning to South Korea

By MAGGIE JONES

JAN. 14, 2015

 

http://www.nytimes.c...ref=todayspaper



#100 NekoKai

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 05:04 PM

I had no idea so many children were adopted from South Korea.  I did know about the recent influx in abandoned children there and that some people think the recent adoption law changes may have had something to do with it. 

 

A lot of the racial/ethnic discrimination some of the adoptees faced in school is what I dealt with for being German.  Same with the "You're not *ethnicity*, you're an American" when going overseas, because those things are apparently mutually exclusive to some people.  So I definitely understand a lot of where they're coming from, but culture is fluid and not based off of race/ethnicity.  So my culture is American, but more heavily based off of older German culture(s) than that of some other Americans, not because of my ethnicity, but because that's the culture that was brought over by my relatives and everyone else who moved to that area, which then gradually "melted" into American culture.

 

I can't say much about being adopted other than what I saw from the people I know who were, but they were adopted either by family or by people of the same nation and race, which I'm sure isn't quite as difficult for the parties involved.  I do wish the article spoke more with the people who weren't all "ban adoption" :riot: on why they decided to move to Korea.  The blatant racism from Klunder and Stoker made it a tad hard to take parts of it seriously, though.  I wonder what they think about interracial marriages and biracial children.



#101 aine

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  • 名無しさん‮

Posted 21 January 2015 - 07:04 PM

It's not exactly related, but it reminded me of this. Because all Asians look the same!

Oh, and also the Somewhere Between documentary I just remembered I meant to watch.

#102 Kimmy

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 03:03 PM

I know someone who was adopted from Korea because he was half Japanese and half Korean, which is apparantly a no-go because they basically just ditched him to be adopted, so I really don't have pity for the people who complain about overseas adoption in Korea since he's probably having a better life here than he would in Korea.

#103 Madara

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 04:06 PM

I had no idea so many children were adopted from South Korea.  I did know about the recent influx in abandoned children there and that some people think the recent adoption law changes may have had something to do with it. 

 

A lot of the racial/ethnic discrimination some of the adoptees faced in school is what I dealt with for being German.  Same with the "You're not *ethnicity*, you're an American" when going overseas, because those things are apparently mutually exclusive to some people.  So I definitely understand a lot of where they're coming from, but culture is fluid and not based off of race/ethnicity.  So my culture is American, but more heavily based off of older German culture(s) than that of some other Americans, not because of my ethnicity, but because that's the culture that was brought over by my relatives and everyone else who moved to that area, which then gradually "melted" into American culture.

 

I can't say much about being adopted other than what I saw from the people I know who were, but they were adopted either by family or by people of the same nation and race, which I'm sure isn't quite as difficult for the parties involved.  I do wish the article spoke more with the people who weren't all "ban adoption" :riot: on why they decided to move to Korea.  The blatant racism from Klunder and Stoker made it a tad hard to take parts of it seriously, though.  I wonder what they think about interracial marriages and biracial children.

 

That's a rather harsh assessment. I went back and re-read the Klunder and Stoker quotes and didn't find anything I'd characterize as "racism." What made you think that? Given their experiences, they have a right to react the way they did and move back to Korea. People in such situations have identity crises all the time and respond in different ways. You can argue that they overreacted, but that's not the same as racism. Klunder does seem to have had more difficulty with her American parents than the others did, but, frankly, she also seems more high-strung than the others. We don't really know the whole story.

 

What about a black student in the U.S. who has encounters with racism in a mostly white high school (e.g. he does better than everyone else on a test and is accused of cheating because no one expected him to do that well) and decides to go to a historically black college and then, after graduation, decides to move to Africa to live and work there, a place he's never even been to? Is that a legitimate reaction or a "racist" one? Plenty of American blacks have done this and I don't recall any controversy over it. Why can't Korean-born adoptees do a similar thing? (I remember when it was de rigueur for black militants to go to Africa, put on dashikis, change their names and come back all "enlightened.")  

 

These are issues worth discussing. Especially on a board where most members aren't Asian but are deeply invested in one form of Asian culture or another.



#104 NekoKai

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 05:27 PM

Oh no, you misunderstood me.  Moving back to Korea isn't racist to me, not at all.  It's things like this:

 

[Stoker] “I don’t think it’s normal adopting a child from another country, of another race and paying a lot of money. I don’t think it’s normal to put a child on a plane away from all its kin and different smells. It’s a very modern phenomenon.”  So she doesn't think it's "normal" to adopt a child if they're not the same race as you, nor to take a kid away from their "kin".  The latter of which is something that every person in history who has immigrated with their children has done.  I'm hoping she didn't mean it this way, but it sounds like she believes in segregation.

 

[Klunder] “You need parents who can talk about white privilege, who can say: ‘You might experience some of this. I’m sorry. We are in this together.' ”  For context she's referencing the racist remarks her classmates made towards her in grade school.  Skipping over a semi-long rant about "white privilege", what she's saying doesn't even make any sense.  She's either trying to say that white people have privilege because they're not discriminated against for being Korean/Asian (which would just be non-Korean/Asian "privilege"), or that white people aren't discriminated against, which is just bullshit.  Also, lack of discrimination isn't a privilege.

 

“I knew that I was the only person of color in their life..."  She's grouping every non-white person into one group like it means something in this context.  Imagine someone saying "The average American can't be racist against Middle Easterners, they elected a black president!"  And this may be more of personal preference, but "person of color" is just as much of a slur as "colored".  It's like calling a gay man a "person of faggotry".

 

Still she quit her job and said goodbye to the boyfriend she loved (“an anti-racist white man,” as she described him).  So now she's implying, if not outright stating, that she thinks the typical "white man" is racist.  I just don't even know what decade she's living in.  I mean her terminology sounds like she's in the '60s, and this is coming from someone who uses archaic words.

 

It's also interesting to me that you mentioned a black student, because I was thinking about how the author's daughter is half-Japanese and half-black, yet she made no mention of having her daughter connect with that aspect of her heritage.  I don't know if they just don't know what her birth father's heritage is or what.

 

Side-note: My uncle had to retake a test (the SAT I think) because he did so well on it that "they" (test-administrators or whoever) thought he had to have cheated.  There was also this really smart kid I went to school with who had to join the army to get a scholarship because none of the people he sent essays and whatnot to believed he wrote them himself due to his high vocabulary.



#105 Madara

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 05:42 PM

Oh no, you misunderstood me.  Moving back to Korea isn't racist to me, not at all.  It's things like this:

 

[Stoker] “I don’t think it’s normal adopting a child from another country, of another race and paying a lot of money. I don’t think it’s normal to put a child on a plane away from all its kin and different smells. It’s a very modern phenomenon.”  So she doesn't think it's "normal" to adopt a child if they're not the same race as you, nor to take a kid away from their "kin".  The latter of which is something that every person in history who has immigrated with their children has done.  I'm hoping she didn't mean it this way, but it sounds like she believes in segregation.

 

[Klunder] “You need parents who can talk about white privilege, who can say: ‘You might experience some of this. I’m sorry. We are in this together.' ”  For context she's referencing the racist remarks her classmates made towards her in grade school.  Skipping over a semi-long rant about "white privilege", what she's saying doesn't even make any sense.  She's either trying to say that white people have privilege because they're not discriminated against for being Korean/Asian (which would just be non-Korean/Asian "privilege"), or that white people aren't discriminated against, which is just bullshit.  Also, lack of discrimination isn't a privilege.

 

“I knew that I was the only person of color in their life..."  She's grouping every non-white person into one group like it means something in this context.  Imagine someone saying "The average American can't be racist against Middle Easterners, they elected a black president!"  And this may be more of personal preference, but "person of color" is just as much of a slur as "colored".  It's like calling a gay man a "person of faggotry".

 

Still she quit her job and said goodbye to the boyfriend she loved (“an anti-racist white man,” as she described him).  So now she's implying, if not outright stating, that she thinks the typical "white man" is racist.  I just don't even know what decade she's living in.  I mean her terminology sounds like she's in the '60s, and this is coming from someone who uses archaic words.

 

It's also interesting to me that you mentioned a black student, because I was thinking about how the author's daughter is half-Japanese and half-black, yet she made no mention of having her daughter connect with that aspect of her heritage.  I don't know if they just don't know what her birth father's heritage is or what.

 

Side-note: My uncle had to retake a test (the SAT I think) because he did so well on it that "they" (test-administrators or whoever) thought he had to have cheated.  There was also this really smart kid I went to school with who had to join the army to get a scholarship because none of the people he sent essays and whatnot to believed he wrote them himself due to his high vocabulary.

 

"White privilege" and "person of color" are fairly common terms in politically correct left-liberal discourse these days. And given Klunder's academic background in social work, she would have heard these terms a lot so it's perfectly natural that she would use them. Which leads me to wonder now how much of her decision to return to Korea was ideologically driven. Certainly, her odd way of describing her boyfriend, which is more of a red flag than the other examples you give, sounds more like the product of her political ideology than a personal feeling. I would be pretty startled if a woman I was dating described me as "an anti-racist white man."

 

As for whether "her terminology sounds like she's in the '60s," we can make the case that such terminology is pretty common in much of the academic world whose participants still see themselves as fighting the same battles they were fighting back then, since the professors today were all student radicals back then and have based their careers on perpetuating "the struggle."



#106 NekoKai

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 06:52 PM

That's very unfortunate, especially for the latter term.  I'm sure the former has useful and accurate applications, but I've seen it butchered so much I can no longer take it seriously except in very specific contexts.  I must have missed the mention of her academic background, I just figured she picked it up from Tumblr.

 

As for whether "her terminology sounds like she's in the '60s," we can make the case that such terminology is pretty common in much of the academic world whose participants still see themselves as fighting the same battles they were fighting back then, since the professors today were all student radicals back then and have based their careers on perpetuating "the struggle."

 

I love you so much for this.



#107 Madara

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 09:57 PM

That's very unfortunate, especially for the latter term.  I'm sure the former has useful and accurate applications, but I've seen it butchered so much I can no longer take it seriously except in very specific contexts.  I must have missed the mention of her academic background, I just figured she picked it up from Tumblr.

 

As for whether "her terminology sounds like she's in the '60s," we can make the case that such terminology is pretty common in much of the academic world whose participants still see themselves as fighting the same battles they were fighting back then, since the professors today were all student radicals back then and have based their careers on perpetuating "the struggle."

 

I love you so much for this.

:smile:   Thank you.

 

A few more notes on "white privilege" or, as it's sometimes used, "white skin privilege." In America, a common example of "white privilege" is not being automatically stopped in your car by the police or stopped on the street and searched and frisked arbitrarily. Or, if you walk into a store, not being followed by security or not being automatically asked for I.D. when you use your credit card. Or when you're looking for an apartment and you see it and decide you want it, the landlord or owner is not going to suddenly call you back and say the apartment's not available after all. That kind of thing.



#108 NekoKai

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Posted 24 January 2015 - 06:16 PM

Yeah, but Asians have those "privileges", too.  But Middle Easterners, who are classified as white by the U.S. government, don't have those "privileges".  Those examples are generally discrimination against mainly young men who are black, mestizo, and/or "Muslim looking", plain and simple, not a lack of "white privilege".  Most of those are also things that mainly happen in New York City which to me is more indicitive of the prevalence of racism in New York City (or of the media's reporting of it) than there being some universal or nation wide privilege that white people (and Asians) have.  And therein lies the problem, it's a gross oversimplification that gets used to make sweeping generalizations about at the very least the third largest and most populous nation in the world, if not multiple countries.

 

P.S. I'm not saying (more) New Yorkers are racist nor that they're more racist than the average person, I think it's more that N.Y.C. is so populous and diverse yet still oddly segregated that it fuels prejudices.



#109 Kimmy

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Posted 24 January 2015 - 07:02 PM

I really can't stand all the "privilege" stuff (ex. Thin privilege, white privilege) since the only times I've seen it used is when someone is being snotty or wants to make someone feel bad about themselves. There's a better way to phrase it without sounding like you're telling someone they're awful because of a quality about them. It just makes me grumpy to hear someone say "check your (whatever) privilege".

Edited by Kimmy, 24 January 2015 - 07:03 PM.


#110 Madara

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 11:08 AM

Prime Minister Abe tries to get a U.S. textbook publisher to revise its account of "comfort women":

 

http://www.nytimes.c...ref=todayspaper



#111 NekoKai

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  • ANGERME

Posted 30 January 2015 - 03:06 PM

I love McGraw-Hill, and fully stand by them and their decision (minus their horrendous lack of the Oxford comma).  But this is equally as wrong: "Korean-American groups have used their growing political clout to amend textbooks and erect monuments promoting Korean views of historical and territorial disputes with Japan."  Facts should be in our textbooks, not the views of whichever group "uses their political clout" the most.



#112 Madara

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 12:21 PM

Now it's China that's cracking down on western textbooks and the dissemination of "western values":

 

http://sinosphere.bl...ref=todayspaper

 

The rich irony here is that the "Marxist-Leninist dialectical materialism" that the Chinese Communist leadership is promoting comes from the west as well.



#113 Madara

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 10:50 AM

Japan gets angry at the terrorist execution of a Japanese journalist:

 

http://www.nytimes.c...&pgtype=article



#114 Ap2000

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  • I program stuff.

Posted 02 February 2015 - 12:25 PM

Japan gets angry at the terrorist execution of a Japanese journalist:

 

http://www.nytimes.c...&pgtype=article

 

This shit is happening so conveniently right now for Abe.



#115 Madara

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Posted 02 February 2015 - 04:11 PM

Censorship in China, as reported by one of its citizens, a student enrolled at Harvard:

 

http://www.nytimes.c...&pgtype=article

 



#116 Ap2000

Ap2000
  • I program stuff.

Posted 12 February 2015 - 07:15 PM

An unusual name for a scandal and I'm afraid it won't change a thing:

http://www.bloomberg...-more-efficient



#117 Madara

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  • ANGERME

Posted 19 February 2015 - 04:09 PM

Radioactive water continues to leak from the Fukushima nuke plant into the Pacific Ocean.

 

One commenter insists it's a threat to the west coast of the U.S. and offers suggestions for precautions in a series of replies. Another commenter dismisses his comments as hysterical.

 

Take a look for yourself: 

 

http://readersupport...tinues-in-ocean



#118 Madara

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  • ANGERME

Posted 14 March 2015 - 06:35 PM

In today's New York Times, there's an obit for Yoshihiro Tatsumi, a pioneering postwar manga artist who brought adult themes and stories of everyday life to manga. His manga autobiography, A Drifting Life, came out in 2008 and I reviewed it on Amazon.com. It was there that I first read about Hibari Misora and Sannin Musume. Here is one frame from the manga:

16404192347_04d14676b9.jpg

 

I used this frame in my latest film blog entry which covers the third film Sannin Musume made together, ON WINGS OF LOVE:

https://briandanacam...ersa/#more-2337

 

And here's a link to the obituary:

 

http://www.nytimes.c...odayspaper&_r=0

 

There was an animated documentary about Tatsumi in 2011, which is actually quite good:

 

16812896792_bcf6110fe6_n.jpg

 



#119 Madara

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  • ANGERME

Posted 16 March 2015 - 12:16 AM

Japan's contestant for Miss Universe is half-American and half-Japanese:

 

http://kotaku.com/th... aleksanderchan

 

Here's a quote from the piece:

 

 

Eriana Miyamoto is the twenty-year-old selected to represent Japan in the upcoming Miss Universe pageant. As reported by Mainichi News, Miyamoto even expressed uneasiness as to whether or not it would be okay for a hafu [half-Japanese] like her to represent Japan.

 

When introducing herself to reporters after her selection, Miyamoto said that her mother is Japanese and her father is American. She added that she was born and raised in Nagasaki and that while she doesn't "look Japanese" on the outside, on the inside, there are many Japanese things about her.

 

The author goes on to discuss some of the controversy surrounding this.

 

w292c-e_1654310.jpg



#120 Madara

Madara
  • ANGERME

Posted 17 March 2015 - 04:28 PM

In today's New York Times, there's an obit for Yoshihiro Tatsumi, a pioneering postwar manga artist who brought adult themes and stories of everyday life to manga. His manga autobiography, A Drifting Life, came out in 2008 and I reviewed it on Amazon.com. It was there that I first read about Hibari Misora and Sannin Musume. Here is one frame from the manga:

16404192347_04d14676b9.jpg

 

I used this frame in my latest film blog entry which covers the third film Sannin Musume made together, ON WINGS OF LOVE:

https://briandanacam...ersa/#more-2337

 

And here's a link to the obituary:

 

http://www.nytimes.c...odayspaper&_r=0

 

There was an animated documentary about Tatsumi in 2011, which is actually quite good:

 

16812896792_bcf6110fe6_n.jpg

 

 

I did a short piece about Tatsumi on my blog today (link below).