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What are you reading? the doomed thread of doom 188 replies to this topic Started by aine , Mar 05 2010 11:45 PM · 

#61 Valerie

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 03:52 PM

I just finished reading The Hunger Games. :( I liked it, though it was pretty Battle Royale-ish. I've just ordered the second book in the trilogy, so I will be reading that next!

#62 Geof

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 03:58 AM

Green Lantern Omnibus Vol. 1, screw you highbrows!

#63 freezingkiss

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 03:35 PM

I'm reading this proof copy of a book I won from Waterstones. 'Postcards From the Heart' - It's WOEFUL. I am only finishing it because I started. God, remind me never ever to give chick lit a go ever again.

#64 Petit Melon

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 10:45 PM

Green Lantern Omnibus Vol. 1, screw you highbrows!



DC SUCKS, YOU LOWBROW!

Actually I like Hal. Only him.

#65 eri

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 12:32 AM

Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion. I can only read a little a day and only at the gym because otherwise, I'd feel too sad =3=

#66 Madara

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Posted 11 January 2011 - 05:33 PM

Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion. I can only read a little a day and only at the gym because otherwise, I'd feel too sad :smile:


I haven't read that book by Joan Didion, but I've read quite a few others, mostly her books of essays, but also two novels. She's probably my favorite female writer.

I just finished reading True Grit, by Charles Portis, the basis of the current movie. I saw the movie two weeks ago, then watched the original 1969 film version, and then decided I'd better read the book. I like both movies very much, but the book is even better. Reading it is like reading the screenplays for both movies.

#67 DarkRidley

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 07:21 PM

I'm reading In the Miso Soup by the other Murakami. It's good so far, but I keep returning to this one bit where the protagonist's girlfriend remarks that a recent murder victim didn't seem to be killed in a Japanese way. How on earth do you kill someone in a Japanese way?

#68 eri

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 07:48 PM

Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion. I can only read a little a day and only at the gym because otherwise, I'd feel too sad :lol:


I haven't read that book by Joan Didion, but I've read quite a few others, mostly her books of essays, but also two novels. She's probably my favorite female writer.

I just finished reading True Grit, by Charles Portis, the basis of the current movie. I saw the movie two weeks ago, then watched the original 1969 film version, and then decided I'd better read the book. I like both movies very much, but the book is even better. Reading it is like reading the screenplays for both movies.


Wow that is a True Grit marathon...you must have really liked the story ;/

In the Miso Soup is so anti-West that it made me uncomfortable the first time I read it.

#69 Plum

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 12:16 AM

I just blew through Barbara Demick's Nothing to Envy.

I have been so engrossed in it, and I now feel like a jerk for being an ungrateful, overfed whiner with running water and fancy shoes. I also want to smack Kim Jong Il, but that's not a new emotion.

This is a part of my recent obsession with becoming more educated on the situation in North Korea. I've also been hitting documentaries pretty hard. The most recent one I watched was Friends of Kim, which is just baffling.

#70 Ap2000

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Posted 19 February 2011 - 12:23 AM

Just finished Murakami's The Wind-up Bird Chronicle and I have no clue wether or not he (the author) explained anything that happened.
If anybody can link me to some kind of (short) essay/analysis, I'd really appreciate it...

#71 freezingkiss

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 08:12 PM

About 270 pages into the massive 'The Crimson Petal and the White' - I was sick of all the spoilers all over UK TV and media. I had to read it, so far, it's really engrossing. You actually care about the characters and what happens to them.

#72 neshcom

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 04:01 AM

Not having a computer has made me an empirically better person simply because I can contribute to this thread.
I'm reading Corey Doctrow's Makers. It's a near future story that tracks the rise of the new inventor in a society where technology is under utilized, connectivity is wide spread, and bandwidth is dirt cheap. The story begins with Kodak and Duracell, two companies that realized they no longer held a stake in a world where cameras live in everything and all batteries are LIon. The newly formed "Kodacell" has a new spin: create and fund thousands of small creative design groups much akin to micro-loans. The inventors in a time where shantytowns are near permanent begin a new cultural revolution: New Work. Follow as the revolution rises and flourishes and as technology and culture shift their focus on encouraging the creativity of the impoverished. It's a fantastic tale so far and I'm only halfway through. I found it free on the android app "Aldiko."

#73 Tsuki

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 12:56 AM

Reading a bunch of Philippa Gregory's novels, I actually really enjoy them. I guess I'm a sucker for historical fiction (and the romance is actually appealing me to somehow, rather than turning me off, I blame my increasing old age. Maybe the also increasing gayness.) So far been through (in order), Earthly Joys, Virgin Earth, The Constant Princess, and most recently The Other Boleyn Girl. I liked all of them for different reasons, and while I can understand why TOBG was arguably the most popular/made into a movie, it was also the most (melo)dramatic, and so it lost a few points with me for that.

Also read The Android's Dream, by John Scalzi. It was very, very well written, even while treading on familiar (for geeks/nerds, anyway) ground. He keeps the narrative tight and engaging, without an excess of dialogue or too much extrapolation. I feel like I'm pulling these adjectives out of my ass, but I was highly entertained by the book.

Currently reading Bossypants, I think I'm about halfway done. It's funny, especially at the beginning, but I can see where she throws in filler to pad the book, and while she somewhat deftly handles this by addressing it directly ("My editor told me this is a cheap way to flesh out the book"), it's still a cheap way to flesh out the book. But I love Tina Fey, and she can do no wrong in my eyes. No wrong. Not even if she were to scoop out babies' eyes and feast on them as a way of maintaining eternal youth. Well, unless she somehow had some part of Mean Girls 2.

#74 Plum

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 02:17 AM

I love Tina Fey, and she can do no wrong in my eyes. No wrong. Not even if she were to scoop out babies' eyes and feast on them as a way of maintaining eternal youth. Well, unless she somehow had some part of Mean Girls 2.


Can we be buddies? :puppyeyes: I'll make you lots of cake!

#75 freezingkiss

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 01:31 PM

Reading a bunch of Philippa Gregory's novels, I actually really enjoy them. I guess I'm a sucker for historical fiction (and the romance is actually appealing me to somehow, rather than turning me off, I blame my increasing old age. Maybe the also increasing gayness.) So far been through (in order), Earthly Joys, Virgin Earth, The Constant Princess, and most recently The Other Boleyn Girl. I liked all of them for different reasons, and while I can understand why TOBG was arguably the most popular/made into a movie, it was also the most (melo)dramatic, and so it lost a few points with me for that.


It's also incredibly false with a lot of made up stuff, I couldn't watch that film either, was incredibly painful and who the hell decided to cast Eric Bana as Henry VIII. I mean, I like the guy, Aussie pride and all that but WTF he is not right for that role!!!

I'm very close to finishing 'The Crimson Petal and the White' - It's excellent.

#76 Madara

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 09:20 PM

I just finished reading "The Izu Dancer and Other Stories," a collection of four long short stories, the first ("Izu Dancer") by Yasunari Kawabata and three by Yasushi Inoue, two 20th century Japanese authors. Interesting stuff.

I'm now deep into "Endgame, Vol. 1: The Problem of Civilization," by Derrick Jensen, the ideas of which have recently formed the basis of the video documentary, "End/Civ," by Frank Lopez. The basic premise is that civilization is unsustainable--in any form--and needs to end in order for this planet--and us--to survive!

#77 neshcom

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 04:44 AM

I've read two books recently Demigod and Public Enemy Zero. Demigod (Jaron Lee Knuth)follows Ben, a young man hospitalized from birth due to the severity of his headaches. After the pain from his headaches reaches a peak, Ben loses all of his hair and finds he gained superpowers! In a short time, Ben masters his super powers and turns to fighting crime. Ben realizes later that his powers can be more effective than simply stopping crime and sets out to better the entire world. A lot of the book follows three of Ben's childhood friends, Henry (the loyal factory worker who has regularly visited Ben in the hospital), Charlie (the stud bartender with women swooning at him at every turn), and Simon ( the control-freak programmer who has become slightly alienated from the other three). It's a really interesting point of view to follow those "closest" to a superhero who feels an obligation to better the world, even if he has to take some drastic steps.

Public Enemy Zero (Andrew Mayne) explores the life of Mitchell Roberts who one day finds out everyone on the planet is out to kill him. What starts off as a pseudo-fast-zombie narrative turns into a MacGyver-esque marathon for poor Mitch. I really enjoyed the thrill of the story and the neo-Cold War perspective really makes you question our life today, but I found a lot of the story really coincidental. Without spoiling anything, the end of the book takes place at a statistically very lucky time of the year for a specific thing. Mitch really is able to go from C-list radio host on a B-list radio station into a running almanac pretty quickly. There is also a sub-ish-plot following "The Naked Man in the Forest" who, at one point, intentionally interacts with poison ivy. That should be a high selling point right there.

Both books I got from the Amazon Kindle store for $.99. I kind of can't comment on the length since my schedule isn't exactly normal, but they both seem like full-size novels; they're really good-length books, especially for the price.

Right now, I've moved onto a "novellette," The Watchers from within Moments, Revealed (Mark Paul Jacobs). Only a little way in, but it seems to have to do with cameras that can take 750 millions images a second and the technology seems to have uncovered a mysterious presence. I think this was free on the Kindle store.

Oh, and the L.A. Noire: The collected Stories (Rockstar Games) collection is free this week. It seems to offer an extended look behind some of the cases from the game and creates new scenarios. I finished the first story and it was rather revealing about the life of a wannabe actress new to Hollywood and the lengths that one will go to for fame.

One things I've found from these cheaper books (like Demigod and PEZ) is that the chapters are really short. Demigod has about 90. It's both strange and comforting to know that there are so many built-in stopping points.

#78 Tsuki

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 05:16 AM

Ugh, I finally finished Pride and Prejudice after like a month or so of reading it. It's never taken me so long to read a book before. I could only get through a few pages a night before I fell asleep. (My typical time to read.) But, I can see why it's considered a classic. The writing style was the most difficult to decipher but the story at its core makes it great. And the dialogue of course is amazing, but there is very little of it and it leaves me wanting more. I can also see why this is considered the "original" Chick-Lit. But I still enjoyed it for what it was, and I expect a second readthrough will be more pleasant and less taxing. Much like Jane Eyre was for me as well.

Finished another John Scalzi book: Agent to the Stars. I can probably say he's one of my new favorite authors, he writes exactly the way I want the plot to go and I find I'm cheering for all his characters. Really knows how to craft a world and make the characters infinitely accessible and with great humor.

I had hour-long commutes for a while, so I took up audiobooks. And turns out they're great for me while I'm driving. Currently listening to another Phillipa Gregory novel: The Boleyn Inheritance. It is very repetitive at times, but I can overlook it, it's got great writing otherwise and the narrators really sell it. I can't get enough of that rich posh British English accent saying lazy slut over and over.

#79 sadude

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 07:17 AM

Ugh, I finally finished Pride and Prejudice after like a month or so of reading it. It's never taken me so long to read a book before. I could only get through a few pages a night before I fell asleep. (My typical time to read.) But, I can see why it's considered a classic. The writing style was the most difficult to decipher but the story at its core makes it great. And the dialogue of course is amazing, but there is very little of it and it leaves me wanting more. I can also see why this is considered the "original" Chick-Lit. But I still enjoyed it for what it was, and I expect a second readthrough will be more pleasant and less taxing. Much like Jane Eyre was for me as well.

That's on my list, and I got about 1/4th of the way through it before giving up. But I added it to my list again, and intend to finish it at some point. Good to know it's not just me. :lol:

Are you going to check out Pride and Prejudice and Zombies? This is part of my reason for wanting to read the original first.

#80 Tsuki

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 09:21 PM

That's on my list, and I got about 1/4th of the way through it before giving up. But I added it to my list again, and intend to finish it at some point. Good to know it's not just me. :lol:

Are you going to check out Pride and Prejudice and Zombies? This is part of my reason for wanting to read the original first.

I was going to mention that part of my reason for wanting to read the original was also to read "and Zombies"; but then I thought that sounded silly. Glad to know I wasn't alone there either. :tongue:

#81 neshcom

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 03:51 AM

Going through a bunch of Philip K Dick shorts. Just finished The Skull.

Watchers was okay, but too cryptic for being so short.

I also read Containment, a story about an engineer who was part of the first generation born and raised on Venus. He wakes up after an accident with memory loss to find out his wife is 3 months pregnant. The Venusian settlement is built to support 1100 people, the 1000 initial settlers and 100 children. Problem is: the kid will be #1101. Now, he has to solve the most sought after discovery: artificial photosynthesis. But what secrets will he uncover?

#82 sadude

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 02:50 AM

I dug up one of my favorite books: "Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain" ( http://www.amazon.co.../dp/0316113506/ ). It's about how cardio is good not just for physical well-being, but for mental as well. It helps create new connections among neurons, helps fight depression, lowers stress, combats Alzheimer's, improves attention/mood/memory/learning, and a bunch of other fantastic brain-related awesomeness. And I can attest to this- I feel so much better overall than I did a few months ago.

Check the first chapter of the kindle edition, if you're interested. When you do get addicted to running, you'll thank me. :eekrun:

#83 eri

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 03:24 AM

^Sadude, you need to post that in the exercise thread to boost motivation. :danceman:

#84 SEPH974

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 11:07 AM

As I really don't like read novelss then I read mangas and currently I've been read:
- Eyeshield21
- Fairy Tail
- Melancoly of Haruhi
- Kuroshitsuji
- Beelzebub
- AKB49
- HanaKimi
- Fruits Basket

Soon, I would like to read Psyren vol. 1 and 2.

Edited by SEPH974, 14 July 2011 - 11:08 AM.


#85 Ap2000

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 02:45 AM

Ordered Murakami's new book 1Q84.
It was quite expensive, 32€ (usually I buy books for 5~12€), but it's fresh off the press and nearly 1000 pages huge.
This will be the first time I read a book with this many pages. Wind-Up B.C. was 600 pages and it seemed already long and large, but this one must weight a whole kilogram.

#86 freezingkiss

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Posted 06 August 2011 - 09:33 PM

I love Vampire Diaries, this shits all over that Twilight bullshit, it's also VERY obvious that these books were where Meyer got her inspiration.

Up to the 4th book now, 'The Reunion' - Flippin sweet.

#87 Petit Melon

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 12:13 AM

Right now I'm reading The Night Circus. It's okay so far, though by the kindle count I'm only 1/4 of the way in. She has a nice writing style that's detailed enough to give an image without drowning in descriptions. I have a problem with the tarot allusion, simple because the cards are not intrepreted in that way. So I am mad that the author did not research into her tarot illusion beyond the obvious "picture on the card is what it means" nonsense. If she puts in the death card I'm throwing my precious kindle to the wall.

There are many characters in the book, and her brevity works against her so far in characterization. I'm not attached to anyone because I don't know enough about anyone to be attached. It's rather odd - I feel like I'm reading a book where the actions dictate the characters instead of the other way around. Like a drama movie that feels like an action movie, I suppose? It's hard to explain. The few scenes they have with each other are strong enough to have an impact, but there isn't any depth to the actions. Perhaps she did this on purpose to increase the mystery but I find it leaving me cold.

Another thing I'm bothered by are the stereotypical characters. For example, the cortortionist. Her name is Tsukiko (I bet she looked up Japanese names and saw it meant Child of the Moon oh wow how unique Posted Image ) and she is by far the stereotypical portrayal of a mysterious asian women we grew up in with media. Petite, black hair, knows things we don't, unique asian features, ect ect. Like the exotic for the sake of being exotic but providing nothing of depth beyond "wooo she's exotic". If it does get made into a movie at least I can look forward to people struggling to pronounce the name. Maybe it'll be as hilarious as "Sakura".

I know this sounds like I'm bashing the book, but I've honestly liked it more than some other books I've read recently. I think I notice things more because I like to write. Who knows how my opinion will change by the end though. I'm promised some sort of deep complex characterization by the reviews. It's not in there 1/4 of the way so far, so it better pick up soon. :|

#88 Petit Melon

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 09:22 PM

I just finished reading The Hunger Games. Posted Image I liked it, though it was pretty Battle Royale-ish. I've just ordered the second book in the trilogy, so I will be reading that next!


Someone at work rec'd that to me so I'll be reading it next. :) Battle Royale-ish sounds like good fun to me!

Right now I'm reading The Night Circus.


Yeah, all of my initial impressions were spot on for the remainder of the book. There was little to no character development. Characters existed and were placed in the plot solely for moving forward the plot. By time big surprise 1 came around, I did not give a fuck. By time #2 came, even though I knew this character more, I did not give a fuck. None of the characters had any souls. I didn't care about their fates at all. But she sure did describe it all perty. The rides became more and more... silly as time went on. At first they were great and imaginative concepts but the later ones were so silly I either skipped over their interludes or skimmed it without caring. (They were in not in conjunction with the plot and were written in second person and tbh I hate 2nd person POV too)

There were 2 main things that bothered me by the end -

1. The romance. They didn't grow together. It was one of those whirlwind superduper quick relationships that bother me. They say they're madly in love, but there really haven't been any actions that dictated it until the "big moment". Also, I hated the cheese. I think I can only stand cheese in shoujo manga. The "fireworks" kiss trope drives me insane. :dammit:

2. For all the stuff she showed us, pretty much everything about a character was told. And like I said before, I did not become attached to any of the characters. It's a circus that has been traveling together for over 15 years at the end. And none of the characters felt like they were close. WTF. How the hell do you have people together for that long and have all their relationships as cold as they were at first meeting?

I bought this book before reading bits of it first and that's my fault. I was promised slow dramatic character development and I didn't get it. When your focus at the end is a freaking romance (Romeo and Juliet of course, because the author editor loves Shakespeare appearantly) and I thought, "Have an epic battle of magic/illusions and a death so I can say something interesting happened" something is wrong. I'll give it a 2.5/5, simply because she is very adept at creating mood. It's sad because there was SO MUCH she could have worked with too. GAH.

#89 The Turtle Moves

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 09:43 PM

Just finished Frank: The Making of a Legend, although he was a major star before I was born he is such an iconic figure in music I thought I would give it a try. Turned out to be fascinating, very well written and I learnt a lot about music in the 40s and 50s. Sinatra was an amazing, if often very unpleasant, character.

Now reading THIS, very good. Makes you realise the Victorians were very strange people, tens of thousands used to queue for days to get a good view at the public executions and if the murder took place in a house the furniture etc. was often sold off as momentos, nice.

#90 freezingkiss

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Posted 16 September 2011 - 04:33 PM

Ordered Murakami's new book 1Q84.
It was quite expensive, 32€ (usually I buy books for 5~12€), but it's fresh off the press and nearly 1000 pages huge.
This will be the first time I read a book with this many pages. Wind-Up B.C. was 600 pages and it seemed already long and large, but this one must weight a whole kilogram.


Read The Passage, that's another brick of a book that really needs reading, absolutely incredible. :wub: